Good Faith Estimate

Under the law, health care providers need to give patients who don’t have insurance or who are not using insurance an estimate of the bill for medical items and services.

  • You have the right to receive a Good Faith Estimate for the total expected cost of any non-emergency items or services. This includes related costs like medical tests, prescription drugs, equipment, and hospital fees.
  • If you have scheduled your appointment 10 or more days in advance, your health care provider will prepare a Good Faith Estimate at least 3 business days prior to your scheduled medical service. If you have scheduled your appointment 9 to 3 days in advance, your health care provider will prepare you a Good Faith Estimate at least 1 business day prior to your scheduled service. If your appointment is scheduled less than 3 days in advance, your health care provider is not required to prepare a Good Faith Estimate. You can also ask your health care provider, and any other provider you choose, for a Good Faith Estimate before you schedule an item or service.
  • If you receive a bill that is at least $400 more than your Good Faith Estimate, you can dispute the bill.
  • Make sure to save a copy or picture of your Good Faith Estimate.

For questions or more information about your right to a Good Faith Estimate, visit, www.cms.gov/nosurprises or call (205-949-2020)

VisionFirst Eye Center Logo

Testimonials

Dr Bearman and his staff are so nice and professional. They have calmed me and made me feel ready for my cataract surgery. The whole staff goes out of the way to make you feel important.

Rita W. 

Dr. Doss is an amazing eye doctor. My daughter who is 4 years old saw her and she was the most caring, sensitive doctor she has seen in a while. Dr. Doss is a must a see doctor!

Nikole P.